dreamdot

D.H. Lawrence once wrote, "I can never decide whether my dreams are the result of my thoughts or my thoughts the result of my dreams." Whether dreams offer a heightened state of awareness or are merely brain synapses randomly triggered during sleep cycles, most would agree that the unusual visual acuity we possess while dreaming is, at the very least, interesting. Likewise, most would acknowledge that emotions generated while dreamng feel just as real as those experienced during daylight hours. The Talmud describes dreams simply as "feeling statements"; others describe them as profound spiritual journeys that are more "real" than reality. Samuel Clemens (a.k.a. Mark Twain) offered possibly the most eloquent description of the waking/sleeping enigma in his novel The Notebook:

"My other self, my dream self, is merely my ordinary body and mind freed from clogging flesh and become a spiritualized body and mind and with the ordinary powers of both enlarged in all particulars a little, and in some particulars prodigiously... Waking, I cannot form in my mind the minutely detailed and living features of a face and a form and a costume which I have never seen, but my dream self can do all this with the accuracy and vividness of a camera... My dream self meets friends, strangers, the dead, the living... and holds both rational and irrational conversations with them upon subjects which often have not been in my waking mind and which, in some cases could never have been in it."

Why is our capacity for sensory detail so much greater in dreaming than in our waking life? What might account for the ease with which we can become an exuberant member of a dance troop or anxious participant in a bank heist? Perhaps it is because waking life requires intense concentration and choices among sensations and memories so that "common sense" can prevail. Given this constant vigilance, our waking life limits us. Dreaming, on the other hand, offers inifinite possibility. The perceptions and memories we experience in dreams occur without interference from our daily surroundings, emotional habits or sensory bias. Whether you agree with this philosophy or not, consider the imaginative capacity of the dreaming mind and the psychological, emotional, and/or spiritual rewards to be found in paying closer attention to your internal dreamscapes.

If you need help interpreting a dream symbol, emotion or action, please consult the dictionary below:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M

N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Can't find the dream symbol you're looking for? Contact adagio@evermynd.com for a confidential interpretation.

Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism
C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles
Encyclopedia of Western Signs & Ideograms
Dictionary, Thesaurus & Language Translator
Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator
The Quantitative Study of Dreams
The Dream Tree
DreamBank